Treatments Hep C – search4answers.com

Treatments Hep C

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An overview of Hepatitis C

Hepatitis C is a disease that is caused by a virus in which affects your liver. Over time it can cause permanent liver damage, liver cancer, and even liver damage. Most people are unaware that they have hepatitis C until it has already caused some damage to their liver. Although, it can take several years before any signs of hepatitis show up.

Symptoms to alert you that you possibly have hepatitis C

Most generally symptoms do not show up when you are first infected by the hepatitis C virus. Hepatitis C does start causing liver damage before symptoms ever show up. When symptoms do start to occur they usually consist of these: feeling tired or exhausted most of the time. You get joint pain and sore muscles, as well as stomach pain. Your skin will become itchy and your urine will become dark in color. Usually after your other symptoms have started to go away you will get jaundice. Jaundice consist of yellowish skin as well as the white part of your eyes looking yellow in color.

Treatment for hepatitis C

Antiviral medicine is not always right for every person. The antiviral medicine is not needed if there is minimal liver damage. You and your doctor should discuss if antiviral medicine is needed to treat the hepatitis C. If medicine is decided, for the best treatment to fight the infection you should take a combination of two medicines that will fight infection. Depending on how much damage is done to your liver, how much of the virus you have in your liver, and what type of hepatitis C you have will determine how well the medicine will works.

If you have hepatitis C you should exercise and eat healthier. Taking care of your body will also help in your treatment. Your doctor may recommend having blood work done to determine if you have the hepatitis C virus as well as to measure how much of the virus is in your blood. Your doctor may also recommend having a sample of your liver tissue taken to help know the severity of liver damage you may have.

Causes of hepatitis C

Hepatitis C is spread through the contact of an infected person blood. Hepatitis C is caused from the hepatitis C virus. The most common way to receive hepatitis C is from sharing needles and any other equipment you may use to take illegal drugs. In 1992 the United States started screening donated blood for hepatitis C, but if you received a transfusion before 1992 there is a possibility you may have received the hepatitis C virus through your blood transfusion or organ donation.

You can receive hepatitis C from getting tattoos and piercings if the equipment is not properly cleaned. Although it is rare, there is the possibility of a mother passing hepatitis C to their child at birth. It is unknown if you can receive hepatitis C from having sexual contact. Common myths about how you can get hepatitis C consist of; hugging, kissing, sneezing, coughing, or sharing food or drink. You have to be in contact with the infected persons blood to receive the hepatitis C virus.

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